Louisiana Counts: Census 2020 

Every Louisianan should stand up and be counted in the 2020 Census. The US Census is more than just a count of our population, it determines billions of dollars of federal funding for a variety of programs that support millions of Louisianans. Census data is also used to determine eligibility, compute formulas for fund allocation, rank projects, and set interest rates for a variety of federal programs, including Title 1 grants, Head Start, and tax credits. Participating in the Census is also the basis for ensuring fair political representation, and helps determine our congressional representation in Washington D.C. and provides the data used to draw district lines.

Beginning in mid-March, Louisiana households will start receiving invitations to respond to the 2020 Census. For the first time, the primary means of responding will be online. All 2020 Census response options are safe, secure, and confidential.

What is the Census? 

 

The 2020 Census counts every person living in the 50 states, District of Columbia, and five U.S. territories. The count is mandated by the Constitution and conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, a nonpartisan government agency. The 2020 Census counts the population in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and five U.S. territories (Puerto Rico, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). Each home will receive an invitation to respond to a short questionnaire—online, by phone, or by mail.

Ways To Respond

There are three ways to respond to the 2020 Census.

By April 1, 2020, every home will receive an invitation to participate in the 2020 Census. You will have three options for responding:

  • Online.
  • By phone.
  • By mail.

In mid-March, households will begin receiving official Census Bureau mail with detailed information on how to respond to the 2020 Census.

Special Circumstances

For some people, it's not clear how they should count themselves or the people in their home. These circumstances may include:

  • People who live in more than one place.
  • People who are moving on Census Day (April 1, 2020).
  • People who are born or die on Census Day (April 1, 2020).
  • People experiencing homelessness.

For more information, visit Who To Count.

How the Census Bureau Protects Your Data

The U.S. Census Bureau is bound by law to protect your answers and keep them strictly confidential. In fact, every employee takes an oath to protect your personal information for life. The Census Bureau is bound by Title 13 of the U.S. Code to keep your information confidential. Under Title 13, the Census Bureau cannot release any identifiable information about you, your home, or your business, even to law enforcement agencies. The law ensures that your private data is protected and that your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court. The answers you provide are used only to produce statistics. You are kept anonymous: The Census Bureau is not permitted to publicly release your responses in any way that could identify you or anyone else in your home.

Being responsible stewards of your data is not only required by law, it is embedded in Census Bureau culture. Strict policies and statistical safeguards help protect the confidentiality of your information. Before releasing data products, the Census Bureau verifies that they meet its confidentiality standards.